femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
Thomas Moran painted The Golden Hour in 1875.
The Blanton Museum of Art writes that “Americans back east were eager to discover the uninhabited western landscape through paintings like this and through reproductions”—though, as they point out, “[t]o make an even more compelling picture, Moran took certain liberties with features of the undeniably spectacular landscapes he observed on his trips to Wyoming during the summers of 1871 and 1872.”
Certainly this painting of the Green River—which glows as though it were gilded—exaggerates the sunset over its stunning cliffs, if not the cliffs themselves.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

Thomas Moran painted The Golden Hour in 1875.

The Blanton Museum of Art writes that “Americans back east were eager to discover the uninhabited western landscape through paintings like this and through reproductions”—though, as they point out, “[t]o make an even more compelling picture, Moran took certain liberties with features of the undeniably spectacular landscapes he observed on his trips to Wyoming during the summers of 1871 and 1872.”

Certainly this painting of the Green River—which glows as though it were gilded—exaggerates the sunset over its stunning cliffs, if not the cliffs themselves.

(via breathing-ripples)